World’s Most Expensive Dishes 30/01/2016

As much as we all love a cheap eat, there’s something so enticing about splashing out a little in a restaurant. Ordering two desserts instead of one, we all want a treat when we’re eating out. Restaurants know this, and in the past few years have devised some of the most outlandish, most expensive foods that you could imagine. And if that whets your appetite for some wallet-draining wanderlust, get saving for a trip to the 10 most expensive places to visit in the world.

1) Bagel from Westin Hotel, New York - $1000

One of the great things about bagels is how versatile they are. If you can think of a topping, someone around the world has probably slapped it onto their morning bagel. Chef Frank Tujague obviously wanted to test this theory when he started offering to top one with white truffle cream cheese, goji berry-infused Riesling jelly and gold leaf. Charging $1000 for it seemed like the next logical step.

2) The Samundari Khazana (meaning “seafood treasure”) – £2000

Curry has been firmly cemented as the UK’s favorite dish for years now, and we have to say, the choice of dishes is mind boggling. Thing is, what if you want something a little grander than a mundane madras or boring biryani? If you have £2000 to spend, Bombay Brasserie in London will prepare the Seafood Treasure for you – they start with a lobster, coat it in edible gold, then add Devon crab, Beluga caviar, white truffle, more gold leaf, four abalones, and 4 quails eggs to finish.

3) The Buddha Jumps Over the Wall soup from Kai Mayfair, London – £108

Aside from being simple and rather comforting, one of the main draws of soup is that it’s cheap. Not so at Kai Mayfair in London, where they’ve created one with a name that sounds like a prog rock album. The Buddha Jumps Over the Wall soup originally contained sharks’ fin, abalone, Japanese flower mushroom, dried scallops, sea cucumber, huan ham, chicken, pork and ginseng. The shark’s fin has now been dropped, and orders must be placed 5 days in advance.

4) The Douche Burger – $666

It’s not often that someone selling you a high priced item will insult you for the pleasure. However, go to the 666 Burger food truck in New York and order their Douche Burger, and according to them, you have it coming. Designed to mock the increasing popularity of decadently expensive burgers, this one really throws down the bejeweled gauntlet – a kobe patty stuffed with foie grois, then topped with lobster, caviar and truffle, and smothered in champagne steam-melted Gruyere and Kopi Luwak coffee BBQ sauce. Once the gold leaf wrapper is on, it’s yours.

5) The Zillion Dollar Lobster Frittata – $1000

Ever since school, when the made-up numbers like zillion and squillion come out to describe something, you know it’s going to be good. While the Zillion Dollar Lobster Frittata from Norma’s in New York might ‘only’ be $1000, for that you get 10 ounces of the finest sevruga caviar and a pound of lobster.

6) Chef Angelito Araneta Jr. Sushi – £1313.88

While most of the high ticket menu items have featured in the major dining cities of the world, to get access to the sushi crown jewels, you’ll have to hop on a plane to the Philippines. There, if you ask Chef Angelito Araneta Jr. nicely, he’ll prepare you 5 pieces of nigiri wrapped in 24-karat gold leaf and garnished with African diamonds. Just make sure you have 91,800 Phillipino Pesos (£1,313.88) to hand.

7) 230 Fifth Hotdog – $2300

At two ft long, this entry on the list feels like you’re getting some bang for your buck. The previous record holder was the $145.49 California Capitol City Dawg, but the $2300 creation from 230 Fifth in New York knocks that out of the ballpark. It’s made with 60-day dry-aged Wagyu, and instead of regular onions on top, these are Vidalia onions caramelized in Dom Perignon. Don’t forget the sauerkraut braised in Cristal, or the caviar and gold on top either.

8) Louis XIII Pizza – $12,000

Most people will agree that ordering pizza in is awesome, but a bit of a rip off. A large pepperoni will set you back about £17, and it’s often late. Leave it to the Italians to do a pizza delivery properly – for $12,000; three chefs will prepare the world’s most expensive pizza in your very own home. Using dough that takes 72 hours to rise, they will then use the finest buffalo mozzarella, three types of caviar, and lobster brought in from Norway and Cilento. To finish, they use hand-selected pink Australian sea salt. If you want to experience this pizza master class, go to the Agropoli in Salerno, Italy, and seek out Chef Renato Viola.

9) Salvatore’s Legacy Cocktail – £5,500

How often can you say you’ve drunk a little piece of history. Using ingredients more than 200 years old, Salvatore Calabrese will prepare a cocktail at his club Salvatore at Playboy, London, that leaves you with a bar tab of £5,500. However, this isn’t some glorified Cosmo. He uses 1788 Clos de Griffier Vieux Cognac, 1770 Kummel Liqueur, 1860 Dubb Orange Curacao and early 20th century Angostura Bitters. Not only this, but he has to actually personally approve each order, so there’s no use just waltzing in and expecting it to made there and then.

10) The Frrrozen Haute Chocolate – $25,000

After all the eye-wateringly decadent dishes featured on this list, how do you end with a bang? How about with a dessert that’s so over the top, your insides will probably end up gilded? At New York’s Serendipity 3 restaurant, the powers that be offer up a chocolate dessert that costs $25,000. Blending together 28 exotic cocoas (including 14 of the rarest in the world), this dessert also comes with a side of the most expensive truffle on the planet – the Madeline au Truffle from Knipschildt Chocolatier. Infuded with 5 grams of edible 23-karat gold, the dessert is served up in a crystal goblet which is then lined with more edible gold. At the base of the goblet sits an 18-karat gold bracelet featuring a whole carat of diamonds. You didn’t think you’d be eating this dessert normally, did you? The restaurant provides a golden spoon, covered in white and chocolate-coloured diamonds, which you are then free to take home too.

Reference: John Murray